Bufflehead Cabin

How public, like a frog
To tell your name the livelong day
To an admiring bog!

— Emily Dickinson

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kathybernie:

Shall We Dance? by Heatherzart

(via scientificillustration)

speedstar-gallery:

L’équipée

(via motorbikesnrollerskates)

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.
British Museum, London

[mzteeeyed posted this picture as a photoset, but I wanted to pull it out for special attention. Thus this post. An appended comment: I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!]

fuckyeahbluegrass:

Seeing the photo of Stringbean you posted reminded me of this beautiful  song by Sam Bush, but until today I was never sure if it was a true story!

thanks for your submission,   stuffsanthings


I came across this tidbit about the song a few years ago:

Sam Bush - The Ballad Of StringBean And Estelle

written by Sam Bush with Verlon Thompson and Guy Clark, the song tells the story of the 1973 murder of David “Stringbean” Akeman, a beloved Grand Ole Opry performer, and his wife, Estelle. The couple was killed during a robbery at their humble cabin north of Nashville.

(via fuckyeahbluegrass)

No one would stand for it [being the fool in the media] in a minute if you took any other group —Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanics, women — but somehow it’s okay to do that with hillbillies.

John Shelton Reed (via modernhillbilly)

(via femmeviva)

tytusjaneta:

   Paul Strand

(via journalofanobody)

theantidote:

The Rapture (by sarahstewart☼)

in the night, shadows are walking on the wall

O crows circling over my head and cawing!
I admit to being, at times,
Suddenly, and without the slightest warning,
Exceedingly happy.

Charles Simic, excerpt from “Heights of Folly.” (via literarymiscellany)

(via journalofanobody)

zaheroux:

Do not let fear stop you, break through those demons
- Animalis Os Fortuna decks available at Zaheroux.etsy.com -
#animalisosfortuna #tarot #thedevil #skeleton #demons #divination

[A striking Tarot deck I’ve not seen! I will buy this and once again invite the Tarot to infest my mind with its brutal meanings.]

(via graveyarddirt)

Ream Daranoi - Fai Yen

(via mzteeeyed)

The minimum wage would be $16.50 an hour — $33,000 a year — if it had kept up with the growth of productivity since 1968. To put the effect of this a different way, 40 percent of Americans now make less than the 1968 minimum wage, had the minimum wage kept pace with productivity gains.

To put this even another way, the average American’s living standard would be much, much higher today if wages had not decoupled from productivity gains – with the gains all going to the 1 percent instead of being shared by workers. If wages had kept pace we wouldn’t feel the terrible squeeze that everyone in the middle class is feeling.

(via clothedinsky)

47burlm:

autumnd4y:

Mountain Home by AdamBaronPhoto on Flickr.

"No phone, no lights no motor cars,
Not a single luxury,
Like Robinson Crusoe,
As primative as can be”
I might ad no “cell towers” or net- yup very do-able .

(via almaraye)

azspot:

David Horsey

[Here’s a vivid example of the gross stigmatization of poor white southerners, a portrayal that would be considered deeply offensive if depicting any other group in America. The hound resembles my son’s hound; the yard looks like my yard; I wish I had that old truck; & I’d patch the holes in the screen door. Nobody, not even a Cracker, likes mosquitoes. Other giving the editorial cartoon readership another chance to make bitter fun of these poor people, what’s Horsey’s point?]

Strange though this may sound, not knowing where one is going – being lost, being a loser – reveals the greatest possible faith and optimism, as against collective security and collective significance. To believe, one must have lost God; to paint, one must have lost art.

Gerhard Richter
(thanks M)

(via journalofanobody)

azspot:

Last Week Tonight - Ayn Rand

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